PI Commitments

49 team-pi-commitments

Program PI Objectives are an integrated summary of all the teams’ PI objectives for a train. They are used to communicate the plan to stakeholders and to measure accomplishments of the train for a program increment.1

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Related Mindset:

Lean-Agile

Segment:

Team

Inputs:

The input for PI Commitments are the program vision, technical and business objectives, and backlog items including epics, features & stories.

Outputs:

The output of PI Commitments are a list of business and/or technical goals that a team plans to achieve in the upcoming PI. The Program PI Objectives are the aggregation of all team objectives.

PI Commitments are a list of business and technical goals that all program teams commit to achieving during the upcoming Program Increment.

Teams make commitments during a PI Planning Event for the upcoming Program Increment (PI). A PI is a construct from the Scaled Agile Framework®. It is defined as:

A Program Increment (PI) is a timebox in which Agile Release Trains deliver incremental value in the form of working, tested software and systems. PIs are typically eight to twelve weeks long, and the most common pattern for a PI is four development iterations, followed by one Innovation and Planning iteration.1

Summarized objectives from the PI are a critical output of the planning session:

Program PI objectives are an integrated summary of all the teams’ PI objectives for a train. They are used to communicate the plan to stakeholders and to measure accomplishments of the train for a program increment.1

The process of putting these objectives together during a PI Planning Event validates the understanding of teams and stakeholders and ensures that they have all of the meaningful information required to achieve the work.2

For more information on PI Planning and PI Objectives within the context of the Scaled Agile Framework®, review the following abstracts:

Common Pitfalls

Even in organizations that have teams making regular PI Commitments, there are problems that can occur in the implementation which cause a derivation from the ideal implementation:

  • Not making realistic commitments: Committing to too much or too little causes stakeholders to lose confidence in the team over time.
  • Allowing business to determine commitments: The team, not business or any stakeholder group, determines and agrees to the PI Commitments.
  • Overlooking dependencies: In order to achieve some goals, collaboration with other teams might be necessary. It’s important to evaluate this early on so each team can plan for and provide what is needed.
  • Not ensuring objectives are satisfying goals: The team shouldn’t just try to “finish the features”, they should understand the business intent and ensure those goals are being met with the work they are producing.
  • Not allowing for stretch objectives: Teams should allow for 10-15% of their total capacity for stretch goals. Stretch goals help the team identify potential variables, they aren’t held accountable for this work but will realize a credit for it if it’s completed within the PI. This allows the team to adapt and adjust as needed during the PI while still meeting the main priorities.

Tools

It’s best to post your team’s PI Commitments in the program tool that the team uses daily.

At Universal Mind, we would recommend the following tools:

References